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Survival Pods Are Your Chance To Live Through The Mayan Apocalypse

Residents in the village of Qiantun, Hebei province, south of Beijing will try and surive the Mayan Apocalypse by living in survival pods.
Residents in the village of Qiantun, Hebei province, south of Beijing will try and surive the Mayan Apocalypse by living in survival pods.
TO GO WITH China-society-offbeat-apocalypse,FOCUS by Tom Hancock This photo taken on December 11, 2012 shows farmer Liu Qiyuan posing with survival pods that he created and dubbed 'Noah's Arc', in the village of Qiantun, Hebei province, south of Beijing. As people across the globe tremble in anticipation of next week's supposed Mayan-predicted apocalypse, one Chinese villager says he may have just what humanity needs: tsunami-proof survival pods. AFP PHOTO / Ed Jones (Photo credit should read Ed Jones/AFP/Getty Images)
Residents in the village of Qiantun, Hebei province, south of Beijing will try and surive the Mayan Apocalypse by living in survival pods.
Residents in the village of Qiantun, Hebei province, south of Beijing will try and surive the Mayan Apocalypse by living in survival pods.
Incomplete survival pods stand in the workshop of farmer Liu Qiyuan which he has also dubbed 'Noah's Arc', in a yard at his home in the village of Qiantun, Hebei province, south of Beijing on December 11, 2012. Inspired by the apocalyptic Hollywood movie '2012' and the 2004 Asian tsunami, Liu hopes that his creations consisting of a fibreglass shell around a steel frame will be adopted by government departments and international organisations for use in the event of tsunamis and earthquakes. Liu has built seven pods which are able to float on water, some of which have their own propulsion. The airtight spheres with varying interiors contain oxygen tanks and seatbelts with space for around 14 people, and are designed to remain upright when in water. AFP PHOTO / Ed Jones (Photo credit should read Ed Jones/AFP/Getty Images)
Residents in the village of Qiantun, Hebei province, south of Beijing will try and surive the Mayan Apocalypse by living in survival pods.
Residents in the village of Qiantun, Hebei province, south of Beijing will try and surive the Mayan Apocalypse by living in survival pods.
TO GO WITH China-society-offbeat-apocalypse,FOCUS by Tom Hancock This photo taken on December 11, 2012 shows a worker constructing a survival pod dubbed 'Noah's Arc' by their creator, farmer Liu Qiyuan, at a workshop in the village of Qiantun, Hebei province, south of Beijing. As people across the globe tremble in anticipation of next week's supposed Mayan-predicted apocalypse, one Chinese villager says he may have just what humanity needs: tsunami-proof survival pods. AFP PHOTO / Ed Jones (Photo credit should read Ed Jones/AFP/Getty Images)
Residents in the village of Qiantun, Hebei province, south of Beijing will try and surive the Mayan Apocalypse by living in survival pods.
Residents in the village of Qiantun, Hebei province, south of Beijing will try and surive the Mayan Apocalypse by living in survival pods.
Farmer Liu Qiyuan exits one of seven survival pods that he has also dubbed 'Noah's Arc', in a yard at his home in the village of Qiantun, Hebei province, south of Beijing on December 11, 2012. Inspired by the apocalyptic Hollywood movie '2012' and the 2004 Asian tsunami, Liu hopes that his creations consisting of a fibreglass shell around a steel frame will be adopted by government departments and international organisations for use in the event of tsunamis and earthquakes. Liu has built seven pods which are able to float on water, some of which have their own propulsion. The airtight spheres with varying interiors contain oxygen tanks and seatbelts with space for around 14 people, and are designed to remain upright when in water. AFP PHOTO / Ed Jones (Photo credit should read Ed Jones/AFP/Getty Images)
Residents in the village of Qiantun, Hebei province, south of Beijing will try and surive the Mayan Apocalypse by living in survival pods.
Residents in the village of Qiantun, Hebei province, south of Beijing will try and surive the Mayan Apocalypse by living in survival pods.
Farmer Liu Qiyuan (top) looks out from inside one of seven survival pods that he has also dubbed 'Noah's Arc', in a yard at his home in the village of Qiantun, Hebei province, south of Beijing on December 11, 2012. Inspired by the apocalyptic Hollywood movie '2012' and the 2004 Asian tsunami, Liu hopes that his creations consisting of a fibreglass shell around a steel frame will be adopted by government departments and international organisations for use in the event of tsunamis and earthquakes. Liu has built seven pods which are able to float on water, some of which have their own propulsion. The airtight spheres with varying interiors contain oxygen tanks and seatbelts with space for around 14 people, and are designed to remain upright when in water. AFP PHOTO / Ed Jones (Photo credit should read Ed Jones/AFP/Getty Images)
Residents in the village of Qiantun, Hebei province, south of Beijing will try and surive the Mayan Apocalypse by living in survival pods.
Residents in the village of Qiantun, Hebei province, south of Beijing will try and surive the Mayan Apocalypse by living in survival pods.
Farmer Liu Qiyuan looks out from inside one of seven survival pods that he has also dubbed 'Noah's Arc', in a yard at his home in the village of Qiantun, Hebei province, south of Beijing on December 11, 2012. Inspired by the apocalyptic Hollywood movie '2012' and the 2004 Asian tsunami, Liu hopes that his creations consisting of a fibreglass shell around a steel frame will be adopted by government departments and international organisations for use in the event of tsunamis and earthquakes. Liu has built seven pods which are able to float on water, some of which have their own propulsion. The airtight spheres with varying interiors contain oxygen tanks and seatbelts with space for around 14 people, and are designed to remain upright when in water. AFP PHOTO / Ed Jones (Photo credit should read Ed Jones/AFP/Getty Images)
Residents in the village of Qiantun, Hebei province, south of Beijing will try and surive the Mayan Apocalypse by living in survival pods.
Residents in the village of Qiantun, Hebei province, south of Beijing will try and surive the Mayan Apocalypse by living in survival pods.
Workers reposition one of seven survival pods dubbed 'Noah's Arc' by creator, farmer Liu Qiyuan (L) in his yard at his home in the village of Qiantun, Hebei province, south of Beijing on December 11, 2012. Inspired by the apocalyptic Hollywood movie '2012' and the 2004 Asian tsunami, Liu hopes that his creations consisting of a fibreglass shell around a steel frame will be adopted by government departments and international organisations for use in the event of tsunamis and earthquakes. Liu has built seven pods which are able to float on water, some of which have their own propulsion. The airtight spheres with varying interiors contain oxygen tanks and seatbelts with space for around 14 people, and are designed to remain upright when in water. AFP PHOTO / Ed Jones (Photo credit should read Ed Jones/AFP/Getty Images)
Residents in the village of Qiantun, Hebei province, south of Beijing will try and surive the Mayan Apocalypse by living in survival pods.
Residents in the village of Qiantun, Hebei province, south of Beijing will try and surive the Mayan Apocalypse by living in survival pods.
Farmer Liu Qiyuan secures a hatch inside one of seven survival pods that he has also dubbed 'Noah's Arc', in a yard at his home in the village of Qiantun, Hebei province, south of Beijing on December 11, 2012. Inspired by the apocalyptic Hollywood movie '2012' and the 2004 Asian tsunami, Liu hopes that his creations consisting of a fibreglass shell around a steel frame will be adopted by government departments and international organisations for use in the event of tsunamis and earthquakes. Liu has built seven pods which are able to float on water, some of which have their own propulsion. The airtight spheres with varying interiors contain oxygen tanks and seatbelts with space for around 14 people, and are designed to remain upright when in water. AFP PHOTO / Ed Jones (Photo credit should read Ed Jones/AFP/Getty Images)
Residents in the village of Qiantun, Hebei province, south of Beijing will try and surive the Mayan Apocalypse by living in survival pods.
Residents in the village of Qiantun, Hebei province, south of Beijing will try and surive the Mayan Apocalypse by living in survival pods.
Farmer Liu Qiyuan sits inside one of seven survival pods that he has also dubbed 'Noah's Arc', in a yard at his home in the village of Qiantun, Hebei province, south of Beijing on December 11, 2012. Inspired by the apocalyptic Hollywood movie '2012' and the 2004 Asian tsunami, Liu hopes that his creations consisting of a fibreglass shell around a steel frame will be adopted by government departments and international organisations for use in the event of tsunamis and earthquakes. Liu has built seven pods which are able to float on water, some of which have their own propulsion. The airtight spheres with varying interiors contain oxygen tanks and seatbelts with space for around 14 people, and are designed to remain upright when in water. AFP PHOTO / Ed Jones (Photo credit should read Ed Jones/AFP/Getty Images)
Residents in the village of Qiantun, Hebei province, south of Beijing will try and surive the Mayan Apocalypse by living in survival pods.
Residents in the village of Qiantun, Hebei province, south of Beijing will try and surive the Mayan Apocalypse by living in survival pods.
Farmer Liu Qiyuan (C) and his daughter sit inside one of seven survival pods that he has also dubbed 'Noah's Arc', in a yard at his home in the village of Qiantun, Hebei province, south of Beijing on December 11, 2012. Inspired by the apocalyptic Hollywood movie '2012' and the 2004 Asian tsunami, Liu hopes that his creations consisting of a fibreglass shell around a steel frame will be adopted by government departments and international organisations for use in the event of tsunamis and earthquakes. Liu has built seven pods which are able to float on water, some of which have their own propulsion. The airtight spheres with varying interiors contain oxygen tanks and seatbelts with space for around 14 people, and are designed to remain upright when in water. AFP PHOTO / Ed Jones (Photo credit should read Ed Jones/AFP/Getty Images)
Residents in the village of Qiantun, Hebei province, south of Beijing will try and surive the Mayan Apocalypse by living in survival pods.
Residents in the village of Qiantun, Hebei province, south of Beijing will try and surive the Mayan Apocalypse by living in survival pods.
Farmer Liu Qiyuan poses among survival pods that he built and has also dubbed 'Noah's Arc', in a yard at his home in the village of Qiantun, Hebei province, south of Beijing on December 11, 2012. Inspired by the apocalyptic Hollywood movie '2012' and the 2004 Asian tsunami, Liu hopes that his creations consisting of a fibreglass shell around a steel frame will be adopted by government departments and international organisations for use in the event of tsunamis and earthquakes. Liu has built seven pods which are able to float on water, some of which have their own propulsion. The airtight spheres with varying interiors contain oxygen tanks and seatbelts with space for around 14 people, and are designed to remain upright when in water. AFP PHOTO / Ed Jones (Photo credit should read Ed Jones/AFP/Getty Images)
Residents in the village of Qiantun, Hebei province, south of Beijing will try and surive the Mayan Apocalypse by living in survival pods.
Residents in the village of Qiantun, Hebei province, south of Beijing will try and surive the Mayan Apocalypse by living in survival pods.
A worker stands beside survival pods dubbed 'Noah's Arc' by their creator, farmer Liu Qiyuan, in a yard at his home in the village of Qiantun, Hebei province, south of Beijing on December 11, 2012. Inspired by the apocalyptic Hollywood movie '2012' and the 2004 Asian tsunami, Liu hopes that his creations consisting of a fibreglass shell around a steel frame will be adopted by government departments and international organisations for use in the event of tsunamis and earthquakes. Liu has built seven pods which are able to float on water, some of which have their own propulsion. The airtight spheres with varying interiors contain oxygen tanks and seatbelts with space for around 14 people, and are designed to remain upright when in water. AFP PHOTO / Ed Jones (Photo credit should read Ed Jones/AFP/Getty Images)
Residents in the village of Qiantun, Hebei province, south of Beijing will try and surive the Mayan Apocalypse by living in survival pods.
Residents in the village of Qiantun, Hebei province, south of Beijing will try and surive the Mayan Apocalypse by living in survival pods.
Farmer Liu Qiyuan poses among survival pods that he built and has also dubbed 'Noah's Arc', in a yard at his home in the village of Qiantun, Hebei province, south of Beijing on December 11, 2012. Inspired by the apocalyptic Hollywood movie '2012' and the 2004 Asian tsunami, Liu hopes that his creations consisting of a fibreglass shell around a steel frame will be adopted by government departments and international organisations for use in the event of tsunamis and earthquakes. Liu has built seven pods which are able to float on water, some of which have their own propulsion. The airtight spheres with varying interiors contain oxygen tanks and seatbelts with space for around 14 people, and are designed to remain upright when in water. AFP PHOTO / Ed Jones (Photo credit should read Ed Jones/AFP/Getty Images)
Residents in the village of Qiantun, Hebei province, south of Beijing will try and surive the Mayan Apocalypse by living in survival pods.
Residents in the village of Qiantun, Hebei province, south of Beijing will try and surive the Mayan Apocalypse by living in survival pods.
Survival pods dubbed 'Noah's Arc' by their creator, farmer Liu Qiyuan, stand in a yard at his home in the village of Qiantun, Hebei province, south of Beijing on December 11, 2012. Inspired by the apocalyptic Hollywood movie '2012' and the 2004 Asian tsunami, Liu hopes that his creations consisting of a fibreglass shell around a steel frame will be adopted by government departments and international organisations for use in the event of tsunamis and earthquakes. Liu has built seven pods which are able to float on water, some of which have their own propulsion. The airtight spheres with varying interiors contain oxygen tanks and seatbelts with space for around 14 people, and are designed to remain upright when in water. AFP PHOTO / Ed Jones (Photo credit should read Ed Jones/AFP/Getty Images)
Residents in the village of Qiantun, Hebei province, south of Beijing will try and surive the Mayan Apocalypse by living in survival pods.
Residents in the village of Qiantun, Hebei province, south of Beijing will try and surive the Mayan Apocalypse by living in survival pods.
A worker stands beside a survival pod dubbed 'Noah's Arc' by its creator, farmer Liu Qiyuan, in a yard at his home in the village of Qiantun, Hebei province, south of Beijing on December 11, 2012. Inspired by the apocalyptic hollywood movie '2012' and the 2004 Asian tsunami, Liu hopes that his creations consisting of a fibreglass shell around a steel frame will be adopted by government departments and international organisations for use in the event of tsunamis and earthquakes. Liu has built seven pods which are able to float on water, some of which have their own propulsion. The airtight spheres with varying interiors contain oxygen tanks and seatbelts with space for around 14 people, and are designed to remain upright when in water. AFP PHOTO / Ed Jones (Photo credit should read Ed Jones/AFP/Getty Images)
Residents in the village of Qiantun, Hebei province, south of Beijing will try and surive the Mayan Apocalypse by living in survival pods.
Residents in the village of Qiantun, Hebei province, south of Beijing will try and surive the Mayan Apocalypse by living in survival pods.
Farmer Liu Qiyuan poses among survival pods that he built and has also dubbed 'Noah's Arc', in a yard at his home in the village of Qiantun, Hebei province, south of Beijing on December 11, 2012. Inspired by the apocalyptic Hollywood movie '2012' and the 2004 Asian tsunami, Liu hopes that his creations consisting of a fibreglass shell around a steel frame will be adopted by government departments and international organisations for use in the event of tsunamis and earthquakes. Liu has built seven pods which are able to float on water, some of which have their own propulsion. The airtight spheres with varying interiors contain oxygen tanks and seatbelts with space for around 14 people, and are designed to remain upright when in water. AFP PHOTO / Ed Jones (Photo credit should read Ed Jones/AFP/Getty Images)
Residents in the village of Qiantun, Hebei province, south of Beijing will try and surive the Mayan Apocalypse by living in survival pods.
Residents in the village of Qiantun, Hebei province, south of Beijing will try and surive the Mayan Apocalypse by living in survival pods.
TO GO WITH China-society-offbeat-apocalypse,FOCUS by Tom Hancock This photo taken on December 11, 2012 shows farmer Liu Qiyuan posing with survival pods that he created and dubbed 'Noah's Arc', in the village of Qiantun, Hebei province, south of Beijing. As people across the globe tremble in anticipation of next week's supposed Mayan-predicted apocalypse, one Chinese villager says he may have just what humanity needs: tsunami-proof survival pods. AFP PHOTO / Ed Jones (Photo credit should read Ed Jones/AFP/Getty Images)
Residents in the village of Qiantun, Hebei province, south of Beijing will try and surive the Mayan Apocalypse by living in survival pods.
Residents in the village of Qiantun, Hebei province, south of Beijing will try and surive the Mayan Apocalypse by living in survival pods.
TO GO WITH China-society-offbeat-apocalypse,FOCUS by Tom Hancock This photo taken on December 11, 2012 shows a woman looking towards a survival pod dubbed 'Noah's Arc' by its creator, farmer Liu Qiyuan, in the village of Qiantun, Hebei province, south of Beijing. As people across the globe tremble in anticipation of next week's supposed Mayan-predicted apocalypse, one Chinese villager says he may have just what humanity needs: tsunami-proof survival pods. AFP PHOTO / Ed Jones (Photo credit should read Ed Jones/AFP/Getty Images)
Residents in the village of Qiantun, Hebei province, south of Beijing will try and surive the Mayan Apocalypse by living in survival pods.
Residents in the village of Qiantun, Hebei province, south of Beijing will try and surive the Mayan Apocalypse by living in survival pods.
TO GO WITH China-society-offbeat-apocalypse,FOCUS by Tom Hancock This photo taken on December 11, 2012 shows farmer Liu Qiyuan looking out from a survival pod that he built and also dubbed 'Noah's Arc', in the village of Qiantun, Hebei province, south of Beijing. As people across the globe tremble in anticipation of next week's supposed Mayan-predicted apocalypse, one Chinese villager says he may have just what humanity needs: tsunami-proof survival pods. AFP PHOTO / Ed Jones (Photo credit should read Ed Jones/AFP/Getty Images)
Residents in the village of Qiantun, Hebei province, south of Beijing will try and surive the Mayan Apocalypse by living in survival pods.
Residents in the village of Qiantun, Hebei province, south of Beijing will try and surive the Mayan Apocalypse by living in survival pods.
TO GO WITH China-society-offbeat-apocalypse,FOCUS by Tom Hancock This photo taken on December 11, 2012 shows farmer Liu Qiyuan posing with survival pods that he created and dubbed 'Noah's Arc', in the village of Qiantun, Hebei province, south of Beijing. As people across the globe tremble in anticipation of next week's supposed Mayan-predicted apocalypse, one Chinese villager says he may have just what humanity needs: tsunami-proof survival pods. AFP PHOTO / Ed Jones (Photo credit should read Ed Jones/AFP/Getty Images)
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