This Week In History: Paul Is Dead, Blondie Hits NYC, Bon Jovi’s ‘New Jersey’, Elton For Diana, and Clapton Loses His License

Hey guys, Joe Causi back with another week in music history — and this week there’s lots and lots going on. Strap yourself in, ‘cuz you’re NOT going to believe it.


The ’60s

Let’s start it off back in 1969, when one of my own, a DJ on Detroit’s WKNR-FM received a phone call telling him that if you play The Beatles‘ “Strawberry Fields Forever” backwards, you hear John Lennon say the words “I buried Paul.”



These three little words started a worldwide rumor that Paul McCartney was dead.


(Photo by Hulton Archive/Getty Images)

(Photo by Hulton Archive/Getty Images)

The ’70s

It would be this week in 1974, Blondie appeared at CBGB’s in New York City, under the name ‘Blondie’ for the very first time.

The name came from comments made by a truck driver who catcalled “Hey, Blondie” to Harry as they drove by. That’s how nicknames STICK!!!!

Check out tons of clips from this show below!


Meanwhile three years later in 1977, Debby Boone starts a 10 week run at No.1 on the US singles chart with ‘You Light Up My Life’.

That’s over two and a half months at the top of the hill… Amazing!


(Photo by John Li/Getty Images)

(Photo by John Li/Getty Images)

The ’80s

It happened this week in 1988, Bon Jovi started a four-week run at No.1 on the US album chart with their fourth release, New Jersey.

The album produced five Billboard Hot 100 Top 10 singles, the most top ten hits to date for a hard rock album.

Those singles were: “Bad Medicine”, “I’ll Be There for You”, “Born to Be My Baby”, “Lay Your Hands on Me”,  and “Living in Sin”.


(Photo by Frazer Harrison/Getty Images)

(Photo by Frazer Harrison/Getty Images)

But it gets better in the very same year, Def Leppard became first act in chart history to sell seven million copies of two consecutive LPs, with Pyromania and Hysteria, which became the band’s best-selling album to date, selling over 20 million copies worldwide, and spawning the seven hit singles “Women”, “Rocket”, “Animal”, “Love Bites”, “Pour Some Sugar on Me”, “Armageddon It”, and “Hysteria”.


(Photo by Michael Kovac/Getty Images)

(Photo by Michael Kovac/Getty Images)

The ’90s

It would be this week in 1997, Elton John went to number 1 on the US singles chart with “Candle In The Wind 97”, a re-write of his 1974 hit about Marilyn Monroe.

This version was raising funds for the Diana, Princess of Wales charity, following her death in Paris. It went on to become the biggest selling single in the world ever.


(AP Photo/Patrick Aviolat)

(AP Photo/Patrick Aviolat)

The 2000’s

And finally it would be this week in 2004, Eric Clapton was suspended from driving in France after being caught speeding at 134mph in his Porsche 911 Turbo. He was given a 750 euro fine and his licence was confiscated. After paying his fine, Clapton posed for photographs.

Which is kinda cool…


(Christopher Polk/Getty Images)

(Christopher Polk/Getty Images)

Meanwhile three years later in 2007, Madonna signed a ground-breaking recording and touring contract with Live Nation, becoming the first major star to choose an all-in-one.

The deal was worth $120 million over 10 years, and would give Live Nation rights to all her music-related projects – including new albums, tours, merchandise, websites, DVDs, sponsorship, TV shows and films.

Joe Causi/WCBS-FM

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