This Week In History: ‘Hey Jude’ Tops Charts, Jerry Lee Lewis Has Horrible Aim, Ferris Bueller Revives a Classic, Paul Jabara, and Tony Bennett

Hi guys! Joe Causi once again with another Week in Music History as we travel back through the 60s to today with some of the biggest highs and the lowest lows we’ve ever witnessed.

The ’60s

It was this week in 1968: The Beatles started a nine week run at #1 on the US singles chart with “Hey Jude.” The song, written by Paul McCartney about John Lennon‘s son Julian, gave the group their 16th US #1 song and the biggest selling single of 1968. What’s really amazing? In 1996, Julian Lennon paid $25,000 for the recording notes to the song at a Sotheby’s auction.


The ’70s

AP Photo/Rene Perez

AP Photo/Rene Perez

It was in 1976, while enjoying his own birthday celebration, rock ‘n’ roll legend Jerry Lee Lewis accidentally shot his bass player Norman Owens in the chest. Jerry Lee had been blasting holes in an office door for fun and missed the door, I guess. Owens survived, but sued his boss. Guess he wasn’t a good shot!


The ’80s

It happened this week in 1986: The Beatles would do it all over again with their amazing track “Twist and Shout”; it re-entered the US singles chart over twenty-five years after it first appeared, all thanks to a little scene in Ferris Bueller’s Day Off.


The ’90s

(AP Photo/Lennox McLendon)

(AP Photo/Lennox McLendon)

It would be on this very day in 1992 when American singer and songwriter Paul Jabara died from lymphoma related to AIDS at the age of 44. Jabara wrote Donna Summer‘s Oscar and Grammy Award-winning classic hit “Last Dance”; he also wrote Barbra Streisand‘s “The Main Event” and co-wrote the Weather Girls hit “It’s Raining Men” with Paul Shaffer.

One amazing talent gone way too soon.


The ’00s

(Theo Wargo/Getty Images)

(Theo Wargo/Getty Images)

It happened this week in 2011: my favorite singer on the planet, Tony Bennett, became the oldest living person to top the US album chart when the 85-year-old’s Duets II album went to #1. The record, featuring collaborations with Amy Winehouse and Lady Gaga, was also his first US #1 in his 60-year career.

And still going stronger than ever today!


Joe Causi/WCBS-FM

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